Game Theory Society
Named Lectures and Prizes

At the occasion of its World Congresses, held every four years, the Game Theory Society awards the following honors, in the form of named lectures, and prizes:

Morgenstern Lecture

Oskar Morgenstern's vision of the need for a new economic science that deals with strategies and coalitions gave birth to game theory. The Oskar Morgenstern Lecture, given at each World Congress of the Game Theory Society, honors an individual who has made important contributions in game theory with significant economic content.

Morgenstern Lecture selection committee for 2016: Roger Myerson, Jean Tirole, Peyton Young (chair).

von Neumann Lecture

John von Neumann was a co-founder of game theory and one of the pre-eminent mathematicians of the 20th century. The John von Neumann Lecture, given at each World Congress of the Game Theory Society, honors an individual who has made important developments in game theory that are of significant mathematical interest.

von Neumann Lecture selection committee for 2016: Francoise Forges (chair), David Levine, Eilon Solan.

Shapley Lecture

Lloyd Shapley pioneered many topics in game theory and their application to economics and political science. The Lloyd Shapley Lecture is given at each World Congress of the Game Theory Society by a distinguished game theorist aged 40 or under at the time of the Lecture.

Shapley Lecture selection committee for 2016: Ehud Kalai, Andy McLennan, Abraham Neyman (chair), Marilda Sotomayor, Nicolas Vieille.

Prize in Game Theory and Computer Science in Honour of Ehud Kalai

The Prize in Game Theory and Computer Science of the Game Theory Society in Honour of Ehud Kalai was established in 2008 by a donation from Yoav Shoham in recognition of Ehud Kalai's role in promoting the connection of the two research areas.

Eligibility Rules for Awards until 2016

The Prize is awarded to the person (or persons) who have published the best paper at the interface of game theory and computer science in the last decade. Preference will be given to candidates of age 45 or less at the time of the award, but this is not an absolute constraint. The amount of the Prize is USD 2,500 plus travel expenses of up to USD 2,500 to attend the Congress.

Amended Eligibility Rules for Awards after 2016

The GTS officers approved in January 2016 new eligibility rules. As recommended by the 2016 Prize Committee (Preston McAfee, David Parkes, Eva Tardos, and Bernhard von Stengel), they follow the eligibility rules of the Gödel Prize (change highlighted in italics):

The Prize will be awarded to the person (or persons) who have published the best paper at the interface of game theory and computer science.
Any research paper is eligible that was published in a recognized refereed journal before nomination, but the main results were not published (either in preliminary form in conference proceedings or on a preprint server, or in final form) 14 or more years before the year of the award. This extended period is in recognition of the fact that the value of fundamental work cannot always be immediately assessed.
Preference will be given to candidates of age 45 or less at the time of the award, but this is not an absolute constraint. The amount of the Prize will be USD 2,500 plus travel expenses of up to USD 2,500 to attend the Congress.

Kalai Prize committee for 2016: Preston McAfee, David Parkes, Eva Tardos (chair), Bernhard von Stengel.


Named Lectures at the 5th Congress 2016, Maastricht


Named Lectures and Prizes at Previous GTS Congresses:

4th Congress 2012, Istanbul

3rd Congress 2008, Evanston

2nd Congress 2004, Marseille

1st Congress 2000, Bilbao

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